What Do Strong Athletes And Strong Families Have In Common?

Perseverance

Strong athletes know that success happens over time, not overnight.  They know that you don’t go from a cartwheel to a back flip, or curling 20 pounds to 220 pounds in a week.  They know that mistakes are part of the process of learning to be their best. They keep working even when it’s hard.

Strong families know that the children won’t go from wiping down the table to cleaning the whole kitchen overnight. They know that the lawnmower lines won’t be straight on the first few mowings. They know that mistakes are part of the process and parents keep working even when it’s hard.

Consistency

Strong athletes know that to be good, really good, they need to practice multiple times a week and prioritize these practices over other, non-essential activities.  They have a plan and they work consistently to carry out that plan.

Strong families know that to be good, really good, they need to implement their plan multiple times a week, or even daily, even when it is quicker for parents to do everything themselves.

Self-Reflection

Strong Athletes know that it is important to be good observers of their performance and accept feedback from others who have gone before them.  They know that if there is a weakness, they will need to face it and focus on it, rather than turn away from it.

Strong families know that it is important for parents to take the time to notice and ask what other successful families are doing and to connect with each other to reflect on what is going well and what needs more work. Parents learn, through self-reflecting on the process, where the hearts of their children are and where they need work.

Prioritizing

Strong athletes know that they need to prioritize their core training every day.  They know that without a strong foundation on the basics, the tricks will not come along as well, more injuries may result and they will not reach their goals as efficiently.

Strong families know that they need to prioritize the basics of good communication, sharing meals together and connecting without distractions in order to develop a strong foundation. They know that without developing this spirit of community, they will find it very difficult to accomplish anything more in the family.

Confidence

Strong athletes know that they need to have a fighting spirit and act as-if they are already champions.  They look in the mirror, like what they see and can see themselves meeting the next challenge.  They are not deterred by hard work.  They know they can do it.

Strong families know that they need to have a confidant, can-do attitude. Parents know that even if they could have handled a challenge differently or more effectively, they are secure in their rights and responsibilities to lead the family.

Goal Oriented

Strong athletes work toward a goal, whether it is a faster time, heavier weight or next level.  They know they won’t progress effectively if they have random targets.

Strong families set goals that are reasonable for a child’s age an abilities. Parents don’t bit off more than they can chew, only to fail and feel defeated. They take pride in small, steady progress toward set goals.

Rest and Relaxation

Strong athletes know that they benefit from a rest day, both to rest their body and to rest their mind.  They know that they can get back to their goal with renewed strength at the end of the rest period.

Strong families know that pushing on the children and the family goals every day or too many days in a week may burden the system. Parents take time to escape with the children for fun things, laughter and joy. They have a rest day and they break with routine on occasion and run out for fast food.

Humility

Strong athlete maintain an attitude of sportsmanship at the same time as working for their own personal best. They are able to cheer others successes and encourage someone who has taken a hit. They understand that they can learn from their oldest competitor and their youngest competitor.

Strong families know that they are not competing agains each other. Mom is not competing against dad and both recognize that they each have valuable gifts to bring to the family. This teaches the children they they are not competing against each other and that they can encourage each other.

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